Let us Inspire You

IHG offers a foundation of excellence upon which to build your career in hospice. We are on a constant search for the best nurses, hospice aides, social workers, spiritual care specialists, hospice physicians, bereavement/volunteer coordinators and administrative staff for all of our locations.

View Positions


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

IHG invests heavily in the training and development of every member of its team. From our unique, intensive orientation through continuing annual education, to every day mentoring from our top-class clinicians and administrators, we support you all the way to the top of your profession.


BENEFITS

With “empowering our people” to the forefront of our mission, Inspiring takes employee benefits seriously. We go toe-to-toe with our big corporate competitors, offering three weeks’ paid vacation to beginning employees, in addition to dental, vision, fully-paid employee health insurance, short and long term disability – even life insurance. We’ve just added a 401k with employer match, and continue to look for ways in which we can serve our employees even better.




Our People

Read about a few of our Team members, and their dedication to first-class hospice care.

Cathy Van Dyke

Volunteer & Bereavement Coordinator, High Desert Hospice

“I have the privilege of providing support to the families of our hospice patients during a very difficult time in their lives.”


  • Tell us about your job
  • Why do you work in hospice?
  • Who is someone you admire, and why?
  • Do you have any skills or talents that most people don’t know about?
Tell us about your job

As a volunteer coordinator, I have the honor of providing our hospice patients with things they need as well as things they would love to have. Making sure they have a good quality of life is very important to High Desert Hospice and I am privileged to be a part of it. Whether it is a hearing device so they can hear their favorite song, or audiobooks so they can continue to hear the books they can no longer read, or providing them with a Christmas dinner when their family lives far away. These are just some of the opportunities I have to make someone’s life a little better. I also have the privilege of working with amazing volunteers who are ready and willing to do all they can to bring a smile to the face of a hospice patient. As the Bereavement Coordinator, I have the privilege of providing support to the families of our hospice patients during a very difficult time in their lives.

Why do you work in hospice?

I have worked with the elderly for the past 15 years and was able to see the care and support that Hospice offered to patients and their families first hand. It was something that I knew I needed to be a part of.

Who is someone you admire, and why?

I have had the privilege of working with an amazing nurse over the past 15 years. I have seen her meet a hospice patient and their family in a snow blizzard in the middle of the night, to sign them onto hospice and make sure the patient could be with his family at the end of his life. I have seen her hire a snowplow to plow someone’s driveway to make sure they were able to get home from the hospital. She provides Christmas trees and presents when a family would have none. She anticipates the needs of the most vulnerable people and makes patients and families feel at ease and comfortable. She is the reason that I felt I needed to work with Hospice, to make a difference in their lives. Her name is Barbara Golden.

Do you have any skills or talents that most people don’t know about?

Most people don’t know that I am an artist and have sold paintings in the past.


Autumn Blanchard

Patient Care Manager, High Desert Hospice

“I wanted the opportunity to practice nursing in an organic way without many of the constraints that are necessary within other healthcare formats.”


  • Tell us about your job.
  • Why do you work in hospice?
  • Who is someone you admire, and why?
  • Do you have any skills or talents that most people don’t know about?
Tell us about your job.

I am a Patient Care Manager and an RN. I supervise the team and the clinical care of our hospice patients. I assist with managerial tasks such as training and on-boarding, supply ordering, and scheduling. I also have a small number of patients for whom I am the primary nurse.

Why do you work in hospice?

I wanted the opportunity to practice nursing in an organic way without many of the constraints that are necessary within other healthcare formats. I wanted to find a way to meet people where they were at and to try to positively impact others without trying to change or manipulate people or situations. Once I had worked in hospice for a little while, I realized that it was one of the most raw and true ways to practice nursing and to serve others, and I can’t see being a nurse in any other field.

Who is someone you admire, and why?

I have been blessed to know and work with many wonderful, intelligent, and special people throughout my life. Two people whom I look up to and greatly admire are my parents. I respect their commitment to each other, to their family, and to what they believe to be right. I admire that they work hard and are constantly improving themselves and the world that they live in. They love big, have fun, and take care of others. They are also two people that I enjoy spending time with and who I hope to emulate.

Do you have any skills or talents that most people don’t know about?

I love learning new things and picking up new skills. Some of my hobbies that most people don’t know about include throwing an AtlAtl, target shooting, snowboarding, wakeboarding, speed reading, organizing, and mushroom hunting.


Allison Lamb

Social Worker, Inspiring Hospice Partners of Georgia

“…It is an honor to be invited into the homes and hearts of our patients and families.”


  • Tell us about your job
  • Why do you work in hospice?
  • Who is someone you admire, and why?
  • Do you have any skills or talents that most people don’t know about?
Tell us about your job

My job as a social worker in a hospice setting is to connect families with resources that might make emotional or financial strain easier to bear, in addition to using my master’s level skill in psychoeducation to provide coping and communication strategy training, emotional support, and grief support. I like to tell my patients and families that I can help them apply for assistance programs, help them find long-term care in a nursing facility, simply be a presence to listen, validate, and support, or anything in between.

Why do you work in hospice?

I found myself in hospice truly randomly. I began my social work career planning to exclusively work in substance use counseling and supportive services and took an internship in grad school with a hospice on a pure whim. I fell in love immediately with the intimate and heartfelt connections we have the privilege of making with our families. The ability to still see growth and emotional healing happen in the midst of death, and the longterm relationships formed over the course of care that are formed between the team and our patients/families. In hospice, we have the unique opportunity to be a part of very sacred moments, and it is an honor to be invited into the homes and hearts of our patients and families.

Who is someone you admire, and why?

I had a supervisor at a previous job years ago that truly embodies social work. She was (and is!) empathetic, intelligent, resourceful, knew her own limits and personal boundaries, and was able to communicate them kindly and effectively. She taught me how to remain compassionate and in touch with the reasons I love social work during times of stress when it might be easy to feel overwhelmed.

Do you have any skills or talents that most people don’t know about?

I really love to bake, and I’m pretty good at it! My mom recently gave me her old KitchenAid mixer, and I am absolutely smitten. I love to experiment with different recipes my grandmother passed down, and I do my best to find beauty in my baking disasters!


Dr. Ken Reed

Spiritual Care Coordinator, Inspiring Hospice Partners of Georgia

“The work I do is an awesome opportunity to impact the lives of the patients we serve in a very special way”


  • Tell us about your job
  • Why do you work in hospice?
  • Who is someone you admire and why?
  • Do you have any skills or talents that most people don’t know about?
Tell us about your job

The work I do is an awesome opportunity to impact the lives of the patients we serve in a very special way through spiritual care and chaplaincy support.
Spiritual care, also known as pastoral care, is an important part of hospice care—the interdisciplinary, compassionate care services that support patients and families through the end-of-life and grieving process.
Whatever an individual’s belief system or cultural tradition may be—whether they consider themselves to be religious or not—there is potential value to be found in accepting the offer of spiritual counseling.
A hospice chaplain, or spiritual counselor, is trained to assess individual needs and to meet each person they serve wherever they are in their own understanding. Spiritual counselors never proselytize or try to tell someone what to think. Rather, they are trained to be active listeners and to comfort the people they serve by guiding them through their own questions and emotions and offering insight and inspiration when needed. They also can assist patients with conceptualizing and planning a life celebration or memorial service.
My duty and privilege are to serve the patient and family and support the hospice team and facility staff where our patients may reside.

Why do you work in hospice?

I have over 27 years of pastoral care experience. I have been working as a chaplain/spiritual care coordinator in the hospice setting for over five years. I was blessed to receive special training and board certification as a chaplain working in palliative care. This work has been very rewarding as I have worked with many wonderful patients and their families experiencing the end of life journey. I am a caregiver at home with two adult children with significant challenges related to their disabilities. I feel this gives me additional insight into special family dynamics and needs related to caring for loved ones. I truly believe that this work is my calling and where I am supposed to be in this season of my life.

Who is someone you admire and why?

I have a special admiration for my sons who experience autism. They have overcome so many challenges in their life and still struggle with various aspects of daily living due to their neuro-developmental disorder. They have the special gift of showing love and acceptance for everyone they meet, no matter what. This helps to remind me of how everyone should behave towards others.

Do you have any skills or talents that most people don’t know about?

I guess some skills would be cooking, music, advocacy, and the ability to meet and develop relationships with people. It has been my experience to get along with 99% of humanity.